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bearline:

oh my lord. this is a photo of what success looks like.

bearline:

oh my lord. this is a photo of what success looks like.

stormbornvalkyrie:

The Northern girl. Winterfell’s daughter. We heard she killed the king with a spell, and afterwards changed into a wolf with the big leather wings of a bat, and flew out the tower window. x

stormbornvalkyrie:

The Northern girl. Winterfell’s daughter. We heard she killed the king with a spell, and afterwards changed into a wolf with the big leather wings of a bat, and flew out the tower window. x

hobbitofthemotherfuckinshire:

If Game of Thrones has taught me anything it’s Kings are fucking weak and don’t mess with a Queen

arthnoldpendragon:

steven moffat is the writer of some of doctor who’s scariest monsters, for example the weeping angels, atrocious writing and misogyny

paintgod:

my brief was to “Ask someone for instructions in what to do and then obey them” and i think i did pretty well! i asked my friend “what should i do for this assignment?” and she said the above quote and then i had to make a record of it!!

paintgod:

my brief was to “Ask someone for instructions in what to do and then obey them” and i think i did pretty well! i asked my friend “what should i do for this assignment?” and she said the above quote and then i had to make a record of it!!

posted 1 week ago with 136,126 notes via zombres and paintgod
tagged as: #this so fucking speaks to this generation and its relation to art and it's beautiful 

❝ I also tried to provide a certain moment of pathos with the death. I mean, Joffrey, as monstrous as he is — and certainly he’s just as monstrous in the books as he is in the TV show, and Jack has brought some incredible acting chops to the role that somehow makes him even more loathsome than he is on the page — but Joffrey in the books is still a 13-year-old kid. And there’s kind of a moment there where he knows that he’s dying and he can’t get a breath and he’s kind of looking at Tyrion and at his mother and at the other people in the hall with just terror and appeal in his eyes—you know, “Help me mommy, I’m dying.” And in that moment, I think even Tyrion sees a 13-year-old boy dying before him. So I didn’t want it to be entirely, “Hey-ho, the witch is dead.” I wanted the impact of the death to still strike home on to perhaps more complex feelings on the part of the audience, not necessarily just cheering. ❞

New York and Paris by Garancé Doré